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Caring at Home

Leah Cerys

Some babies require the facilities of the Special Care Baby Unit only until breathing and feeding are established. These babies can then transferred to a ‘baby ward’, and parents may have the option of taking a baby home when hospital care is not required. Specialised support should be arranged together with a structured care plan to prepare a family for problems that may arise. A care plan must be flexible to the changing needs of the baby or the family. 

Hospice Care

If there is a Children’s Hospice in your area, they may be able to provided ‘home from home support’. Families taking a baby home should be informed about physiotherapy, respite and shared care, and state allowances.

Shared Care Fostering and Adoption

Although survival into childhood is rare, you could be faced with caring 
for a child with severe developmental delay. Other options you may consider could include shared care, fostering, or adoption. 

Moving and Handling Needs

The Scottish Government has produced a guide to the Moving and Handling of Young People.  This is designed as an easy read guide for anyone working with disabled young people.  Although designed in Scotland, it covers the broad issues related to all moving and handling.